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Weigert, E. (1958). Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, M.D—1890-1957. Bul. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 14:379-380.

(1958). Bulletin of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 14:379-380

Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, M.D—1890-1957

Edith Weigert, M.D.

On April 28, 1957 Frieda Fromm-Reichmann died of an acute coronary thrombosis at the age of 67 in her home at Chestnut Lodge, Rockville, Maryland. Her patients have lost a therapist whose refined empathy broadened the limits of human understanding, even of the most inaccessible schizophrenics. Her indefatigable patience and dedication reopened for many patients the tragically closed doors of human fellowship. Her students have lost an inspired and inspiring teacher, a courageous explorer in the field of psychoanalytic and psychiatric research. Her colleagues have lost in her a most generous friend, a charming hostess and guest with a congenial understanding of music, painting, and literature.

Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, in 1890, Frieda Fromm-Reichmann graduated from medical school at Königsberg, Eastern Prussia, in 1913. During the First World War she assisted Professor Kurt Goldstein in the care of brain-injured soldiers, following him from Königsberg to Frankfurt-on-Main. In the early twenties she assisted Professor I. H. Schultz at his psychotherapeutic sanitarium "Weisser Hirsch" near Dresden, and was visiting physician at Professor Kraepelin's psychiatric clinic of the University of Munich. From 1923 to 1926 she received her psychoanalytic training in Munich and Berlin. After her membership in the German Psychoanalytic Association was established, she was in charge of a private psychoanalytic sanitarium in Heidelberg. Together with her husband—the psychoanalytically trained social psychologist Erich Fromm—from whom she separated later in life, she founded and taught at a psychoanalytic institute for South West Germany.

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