Login
Rose, L. (1988). Freud and Fetishism: Previously Unpublished Minutes of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society. Psychoanal Q., 57:147-166.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

(1988). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 57:147-166

Freud and Fetishism: Previously Unpublished Minutes of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society

Louis Rose Author Information

INTRODUCTION

The Vienna Psychoanalytic Society was the first organization for teaching psychoanalysis and expanding its following. The minutes published here record the meeting of the society on February 24, 1909. Dating from the earliest period of the movement, they have unique importance. At this meeting, Freud presented his first paper on the phenomenon of fetishism.

In 1902, Sigmund Freud and four physicians—Alfred Adler, Max Kahane, Rudolf Reitler, and Wilhelm Stekel—began meeting once a week at Freud's home to discuss psychoanalysis. As the circle slowly increased its number and expanded its agenda, it drew on both non-medical and medical professions. Members presented papers on the theory of psychoanalysis, on its application to cultural sciences, and, as their therapeutic experience grew, on case findings. In 1908, the group took the name "Psychoanalytic Society." Before the First World War, its official membership reached just over forty, but throughout the period from its founding to the war, fewer than half this number became active members. The society experienced its

—————————————

I would like to thank Dr. E. James Lieberman for bringing the existence of these minutes to my attention and for his assistance with their publication; Dr. Ernst Federn and Mr. Kenneth Lohf for their permission to publish this document; and Manfred Boemeke for assistance with its transcription and translation. These minutes are part of the Otto Rank Collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University.

- 147 -

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.