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Meyer, B.C. (1950). Betty M. and the Seven Dwarfs: A Contrapuntal, Essay on Raynaud's Disease. Am. Imago, 7(3):329-341.

(1950). American Imago, 7(3):329-341

Betty M. and the Seven Dwarfs: A Contrapuntal, Essay on Raynaud's Disease

Bernard C. Meyer, M.D.

Once upon a time in the middle of the winter, when snowflakes were falling like feathers from the sky, a Queen sat at her window working, and her embroidery frame was of ebony. And as she worked, gazing at times out on the snow, she pricked her finger, and there fell from it three drops of blood on the snow. And when she saw how bright and red it looked, she said to herself, “Oh that I had a chüdtas white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as the wood of the embroidery frame!” Not very long afterwards she had a daughter, with a skin as white as snow, lips as red as blood, and hair as black as ebony, and she was named Snow White. And when she was born the Queen died.

In 1933, toward the early part of the winter, 22 year old Mrs. Betty M. sat at her place of employment sewing. And as she sewed she pricked her finger with a needle. Only a few months before this happening she had given birth to a son who died five hours later. The finger became infected and it became necessary to amputate the end of it. She was told she had Raynaud's disease. Five years later Betty had another son who lived. One month after his birth, while changing his diaper, Betty again pricked her finger, this time on the left hand, and again an infection set in.

After a year had gone by, the King took another wife, a beautiful woman, but proud and overbearing, and she could not bear to be surpassed in beauty by anyone.

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