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Pigman, G.W., III (2004). Via regia zum Unbewußten. Freud und die Traumforschung im 19. Jahrhundert [The Royal Road to the Unconscious: Freud and Dream Research in the Nineteenth Century]. Stefan Goldmann. Gießen: Psychosozial-Verlag. 2003. 286 pp. 29.90 Euro. Dreaming by the Book: Freud's “The Interpretation of Dreams” and the History of the Psychoanalytic Movement. Lydia Marinelli and Andreas Mayer. Trans. Susan Fairfield. New York: Other Press. 2003. vi + 251 pp. $28.00.. Am. Imago, 61(3):397-403.

(2004). American Imago, 61(3):397-403

Via regia zum Unbewußten. Freud und die Traumforschung im 19. Jahrhundert [The Royal Road to the Unconscious: Freud and Dream Research in the Nineteenth Century]. Stefan Goldmann. Gießen: Psychosozial-Verlag. 2003. 286 pp. 29.90 Euro. Dreaming by the Book: Freud's “The Interpretation of Dreams” and the History of the Psychoanalytic Movement. Lydia Marinelli and Andreas Mayer. Trans. Susan Fairfield. New York: Other Press. 2003. vi + 251 pp. $28.00.

Review by:
G. W. Pigman, III

The one-hundredth anniversary of the publication of The Interpretation of Dreams in November 1899 prompted a number of important works: a facsimile of the first German edition with essays by Ilse Grubrich-Simitis, Mark Solms, and Jean Starobinski; a translation of the first edition by Joyce Crick; and a collection of essays edited by Marinelli and Mayer that includes the earlier version of their book under review.1 Along with Goldmann's The Royal Road to the Unconscious: Freud and Dream Research in the Nineteenth Century, these works mark a tremendous advance in the historical study of Freud's dream theory, its antecedents in German-language research of the nineteenth century, and its foundation of, interaction with, and reception by the early psychoanalytic movement.

Since Freud reworked The Interpretation of Dreams more than any of his other works-six of the eight editions that appeared in his lifetime have substantial revisions-reading the first can shock those familiar only with the Standard Edition. Ever since the Gesammelte Schriften (1925) reprinted the first edition in one volume and the additions from the subsequent editions in another, everyone has known that the book underwent extensive revision. Marinelli and Mayer's account of these revisions reveals in greater detail than ever before the extent to which Freud's book became a collective project. They trace the relationship between the development of psychoanalytic dream theory and the emergence and institutionalization of the psychoanalytic movement.

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