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(2012). The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic Edited by Ruth Lanius Eric Vermetten Clare Pain Published by Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2010, 315 pages, ISBN: 9780521880268. Att: New Dir. in Psychother. Relat. Psychoanal., 6(2):108-111.

(2012). Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis, 6(2):108-111

The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic Edited by Ruth Lanius Eric Vermetten Clare Pain Published by Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2010, 315 pages, ISBN: 9780521880268 Related Papers

Review two by Simon Partridge, Ex-analysand and Writer

In the summer of 2004, aged fifty-seven, I visited the site where my Fleet Air Arm pilot dad had been shot down in 1940 (he “survived” this and another, then five years as a Prisoner of War) in the Norwegian mountains. This was shortly before my second eight year analysis limped to an end, prompting me to remember the age at which I had been sent off to my prep boarding school (and weekly boarding a year earlier). None of these events was deemed worthy of notice by my three classically trained psychoanalysts (Schaverien, 2011, pp. 146-149). Today I have no doubt that the psycho-somatic-emotional consequences were profound and far-reaching—and I am still exploring their origins and limits.

I spent some seventeen years lying on the couch and in none of that time did I receive anything I could call a “diagnosis”: I was suffering from some apparently unnameable mental dis-ease. It was only after I really decided, post-analysis, that I needed to grapple with the issues implanted by my early boarding, that I was able to steady myself with the self-description “boarding school survivor”, once I had done some group work with the psychotherapist Nick Duffell (2000), in 2006 (Partridge, 2007). Five years later, with a good deal more thought (some of it published) and experience under my belt, imagine my delight when a book titled The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic crossed my horizon.

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