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Brown, K. (2013). Antigone Revisited: Greek Mythology through An Attachment Lens: (Or What Did the Ancient Greeks ever do for us?). Att: New Dir. in Psychother. Relat. Psychoanal., 7(1):64-83.

(2013). Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis, 7(1):64-83

Antigone Revisited: Greek Mythology through An Attachment Lens: (Or What Did the Ancient Greeks ever do for us?)

Kate Brown

The story of Oedipus is well known in psychoanalysis, but less discussed is the story of his daughter Antigone. Antigone is highly relevant to relational psychotherapy since her story involves inter-generational trauma, suicide, inversion of the caregiving role, war, political ambition, and the needs of the individual vs. the needs of the state. An attachment theory informed understanding of Antigone focuses on loss and unresolved grief evident in her story. The importance of inter-subjectivity, percepticide, and the role of social issues such as war and issues around power and gender in the psychiatric system are some of the themes explored.

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