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Blatt, S.J. (1992). The Differential Effect of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis with Anaclitic and Introjective Patients: The Menninger Psychotherapy Research Project Revisited. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 40:691-724.

(1992). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 40:691-724

The Differential Effect of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis with Anaclitic and Introjective Patients: The Menninger Psychotherapy Research Project Revisited

Sidney J. Blatt, Ph.D.

ABSTRACT

Analyses of the data from the Menninger Psychotherapy Research Project (MPRP) have consistently indicated little difference in the therapeutic outcome between patients seen in psychoanalysis and those seen in psychotherapy. Reanalysis of the data from the MPRP, utilizing a distinction between two broad configurations of psychopathology (Blatt, 1974), (1990a), (Blatt and Shichman, 1983), however, indicates that patients whose pathology focuses primarily on disruptions of interpersonal relatedness and who use primarily avoidant defenses (anaclitic patients), and patients whose pathology focuses primarily on issues of self-definition, autonomy, and self-worth and who use primarily counteractive defenses (introjective patients) differ in their responsiveness to psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Based on recently developed procedures for systematically evaluating the quality of object representation on the Rorschach, reanalysis of the Menninger data reveals that anaclitic patients

have significantly greater positive change in psychotherapy, while introjective patients have significantly greater positive change in psychoanalysis. These statistically significant patient-by-treatment interactions are discussed in terms of their clinical implications as well as the importance of differentiating among types of patients in studies of therapeutic outcome and of therapeutic process.

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