Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review The Language of Psycho-Analysis…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Prior to searching a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review The Language of Psycho-Analysis written by Laplanche & Pontalis. You can access it directly by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Brickman, B. (1997). The Curve Of Life: Correspondence Of Heinz Kohut, 1923-1981. Edited by Geoffrey Cocks. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994, 433 pp., $36.95.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 45:589-592.

(1997). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 45:589-592

The Curve Of Life: Correspondence Of Heinz Kohut, 1923-1981. Edited by Geoffrey Cocks. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994, 433 pp., $36.95.

Bernard Brickman

Top: Heinz Kohut with August Aichhorn, 1930s Bottom: with Anna Freud, Topeka, 1966

Kohut's correspondence spans the period from his preadolescence in early-twentieth-century Vienna until two months prior to his death in October 1981. Interestingly, the first letter published was to his father, the last to his son Tom. The concept “curve of life” was Kohut's. The letters provide an historical perspective on our understanding of both the man and the corpus of his work.

Those interested in the lives of the Central European psychoanalytic pioneers who escaped the Holocaust and found on American soil the opportunity to freely exercise and develop their intellectual talents and contributions will find in Kohut's correspondence an extraordinarily rich experience. Kohut never actually met or knew Freud, even though their destinies converged with the events related to the Anschluss. In a letter to Peter Neubauer dated July 12, 1968, he describes the poignant moment seeing Freud leave Vienna by train in June 1938: “When Freud left Vienna, Aichhorn (Kohut's analyst) told me about it and, apart from a friend who accompanied me, I was to my knowledge the only person to see Freud off. When the train started to move I took off my hat and Freud tipped his traveling cap to me” (pp. 208-209). Kohut was at the time a twenty-five-year-old medical student who would himself escape to England eight months later.

In his introduction, Geoffrey Cocks asserts that Kohut's famous case study, “The Two Analyses of Mr.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.