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Apfel, R.J. (1998). The Cry of Mute Children: A Psychoanalytic Perspective of the Second Generation of the Holocaust. By Ilany Kogan. London: Free Association Books, 1995, 180 pp., 45.00 hardcover, 24.95 paperback, distributed by New York University Press.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 46(1):316-319.

(1998). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 46(1):316-319

The Cry of Mute Children: A Psychoanalytic Perspective of the Second Generation of the Holocaust. By Ilany Kogan. London: Free Association Books, 1995, 180 pp., 45.00 hardcover, 24.95 paperback, distributed by New York University Press.

Review by:
Roberta J. Apfel

This first book by Israeli psychoanalyst and clinical psychologist Ilany Kogan, whose work has begun to appear in journals and at international meetings, is a remarkable work. The author uses the book format to present and discuss her in-depth analytic experience with six patients who are the sons and daughters of Holocaust survivors. In addition, there is a chapter, “In the Same Boat,” about living and working as an analyst (particularly with two second-generation analytic patients) during the Gulf War. This is a book that is thought-provoking and interesting reading. Like her teacher and colleague Yolanda Gampel, Kogan is willing and able to share the analyst's side of the clinical encounter. She is the professional “daughter” of the late Hillel Klein, analyst and survivor, with whom she began some of this work; the book, as process, demonstrates the message that a great deal, including enormous insight and compassion, can be transmitted about the Holocaust from one generation to the next.

The Cry of Mute Children begins with the knowledge of how significantly the Holocaust has influenced succeeding generations, knowledge that was so ably and painstakingly demonstrated in earlier case studies in the landmark book edited by Bergmann and Jucovy (1982). Although in clinical studies widespread emotional problems are reported, epidemiological studies and survivors themselves tend to minimize the toll in this population. Kogan builds on the work of Kestenberg (1993) and presents children of Holocaust survivors as one example of people who have perceived/received their parents' pain and repeat some version of what has been transmitted across blurry generational boundaries.

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