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Broder, J.T. (1998). Talking with Patients: A Self Psychological View of Creative Intuition and Analytic Discipline. By Sanford Shapiro. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1995, 224 pp., $35.00. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 46(3):986-989.

(1998). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 46(3):986-989

Talking with Patients: A Self Psychological View of Creative Intuition and Analytic Discipline. By Sanford Shapiro. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1995, 224 pp., $35.00

Review by:
Judith T. Broder

Sanford Shapiro's Talking with Patients is best read as the personal account of a dedicated psychoanalyst's odyssey through the complexities of the theory and practice of psychoanalysis.

Shapiro posits that psychoanalysis, like art, requires both precise technique and intuition. Based on his personal experience of analytic training, Shapiro suggests that classical psychoanalytic education encourages “proper” technique to the detriment of creative intuition. The challenge he poses is to strike a balance between analytic discipline and spontaneity. I doubt that anyone would disagree with this proposition. However, when he suggests that classical Freudian theory inhibits creativity and self psychological theory promotes creativity, I find his argument less than compelling.

In

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