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Kay, J. (1999). The Neurobiological And Developmental Basis For Psychotherapeutic Intervention: Michael Moskowitz, Catherine Monk, Carol Kaye, and Steven Ellman. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1997, 270 pp., $40.00.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 47(1):248-249.
    

(1999). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 47(1):248-249

The Neurobiological And Developmental Basis For Psychotherapeutic Intervention: Michael Moskowitz, Catherine Monk, Carol Kaye, and Steven Ellman. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, 1997, 270 pp., $40.00.

Review by:
Jerald Kay

This collection of essays grew out of a 1996 conference cosponsored by the publisher. Given this provenance, it is hardly surprising that The Neurobiological and Developmental Basis for Psychotherapeutic Intervention is an uneven book whose title perhaps promises more than it delivers. Of the seven chapters, two stand out. The first is chapter 1, in which Allan Schore provides a cogent overview of how early affective experiences between mother and infant promote development and how they possibly relate to in-depth clinical work. Readers seeking a succinct introduction to Schore's earlier substan-tial work (1994) will find this chapter quite helpful. Unfortunately, however, the quality of some illustrations is poor, which detracts from its appeal. Chapter 2, by two of the editors, Ellman and Monk, takes Schore to task for failing to appreciate the impact during the first three months of development of modalities other than the visual. They argue that Schore's model of affect regulation grounded in the attachment process gives insufficient credit to tactile, auditory, olfactory, and gustatory contributions. They conclude their chapter with questions they feel are ignored in Schore's conceptualization. First, given the emphasis on the positive affective relationship between infant and mother as instrumental in development, how does one account for attachments between infants and mothers that are highly sadistic? Ellen and Monk also question Shore's overemphasis on biologically based gender differences, to the exclusion of those related to social forces.

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