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Gold, S. Hilsenroth, M. (2010). D. Bike, J. Norcross, & D. Schatz (2009). Process and outcomes of psychotherapists' personal therapy: Replications and extension 20 years later. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training 46:19-31.J. Norcross, D. Bike, & K. Evans (2009). The therapist's therapist: A replication and extension 20 years later. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training 46:32-41.. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 58(1):142-143.
   

(2010). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 58(1):142-143

D. Bike, J. Norcross, & D. Schatz (2009). Process and outcomes of psychotherapists' personal therapy: Replications and extension 20 years later. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training 46:19-31.J. Norcross, D. Bike, & K. Evans (2009). The therapist's therapist: A replication and extension 20 years later. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training 46:32-41.

Stephanie Gold and Mark Hilsenroth

Two recent articles by John Norcross and colleagues replicate and extend earlier research on the process and outcomes of psychotherapists' personal therapy experiences. In one study, 727 randomly selected mental health professionals (261 psychologists, 232 counselors, and 234 social workers) were asked to describe their own treatment. The rate of personal therapy varied significantly among therapists of different theoretical orientations, with psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, interpersonal, and humanistic therapists the most likely to have received personal therapy and those with cognitive, behavioral, and multicultural orientations least likely. Not surprisingly, therapists in psychoanalysis or psychoanalytic therapy spent significantly more time in treatment on average than therapists who sought other types of treatment. Approximately 24 percent of the sample used psychotropic medication in conjunction with personal therapy. The top four reasons reported for seeking therapy were marital-couple distress, depression, need for self-understanding, and anxiety/stress. In addition to therapeutic effect, all respondents viewed personal therapy as an important prerequisite for clinical practice and ongoing career development.

The majority of the sample chose personal therapists from their own profession and theoretical framework.

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