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Gregory, R.J. DeLucia-Deranja, E. Mogle, J.A. (2010). Dynamic Deconstructive Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder Comorbid with Alcohol use Disorders: 30-Month Follow-up. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 58(3):560-566.
  

(2010). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 58(3):560-566

Dynamic Deconstructive Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder Comorbid with Alcohol use Disorders: 30-Month Follow-up

Robert J. Gregory, Evan DeLucia-Deranja and Jacqueline A. Mogle

Patients having co-occurring borderline personality disorder and alcohol use disorders constitute a common but particularly severe and refractory subgroup. A recent randomized controlled trial (Gregory and Remen 2008) employed dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy (DDP), a time-limited, manual-based weekly individual treatment. Thirty participants with co-occurring alcohol use disorders and borderline personality disorder (BPD) received 12 months of either DDP or optimized community care (OCC). DDP resulted in significant decreases in heavy drinking days, parasuicide episodes, and institutional care, as well as significant improvements in core symptoms of BPD, depression, and perceived social support (Gregory et al. 2008). Although the results of this trial were promising, the long-term outcomes are not known. The present study directly addresses this question by reporting on the 30-month outcomes of the participants in that trial and testing the hypothesis that treatment gains achieved during treatment with DDP will be sustained after treatment ends.

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