Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To convert articles to PDF…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

At the top right corner of every PEP Web article, there is a button to convert it to PDF. Just click this button and downloading will begin automatically.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Thomson, J. (1993). We've Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy and the World's Getting Worse by James Hillman and Michael Ventura. Published by Harper Collins, San Francisco, 1992; 242 pages; £11.99.. Brit. J. Psychother., 9(4):498-500.
   

(1993). British Journal of Psychotherapy, 9(4):498-500

We've Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy and the World's Getting Worse by James Hillman and Michael Ventura. Published by Harper Collins, San Francisco, 1992; 242 pages; £11.99.

Review by:
Jean Thomson

Dear Jim and Michael

It's a good idea to publish your dialogues and letters to each other as a way of making an amusing and informal book about what psychotherapy has not achieved and how much more politically influential it could usefully be. You aim for spontaneity and, although there are some ponderous flippancies which show this reader anyway that Americans and English do not necessarily laugh at the same things, the method does make a book which can be read by practitioners and public. I would have it as a book to be dipped into because you avoid being ‘linear’ and sequential, and there is much knowledge, wordly awareness and ideas about mythology and cultural trends in the various letters and bits of dialogue.

There is a main basis for the discussion, the focus you might say, reminding us that focus is the Latin for hearth, where Hestia is the goddess, paired with Hermes the communicator, the messenger. My association, in the sort of apparent non-sequitur way characteristic of your book, was to Jung's autobiographical description in Memories, Dreams, Reflections of the building of The tower which represented his self - at the centre he built ‘the maternal hearth’. Jung the communicator was experiencing the maternal hearth as his centre, giving him a focus. In fact, this bit of linking is not really unconnected and is rather what you are, I believe, doing - pointing out to your readers that in the world of psychotherapy - or rather, therapy, as you say most of the time - we conceptualise linking in too narrow a framework, missing the age-long archetypcal experiences which inform the unconscious and thus our behaviour.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.