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White, K. (2002). Adult Attachment and Couple Therapy: The ‘Secure-Base’ in Practice and Research edited by Christopher Clulow. Published by Brunner-Routledge, London, 2001; 228 pages.. Brit. J. Psychother., 19(2):261-263.
   

(2002). British Journal of Psychotherapy, 19(2):261-263

Adult Attachment and Couple Therapy: The ‘Secure-Base’ in Practice and Research edited by Christopher Clulow. Published by Brunner-Routledge, London, 2001; 228 pages.

Review by:
Kate White

Christopher Clulow has set out to bring together 17 contributors to write about psychotherapy with couples from an attachment perspective. The book aims to provide a framework for assessing and working with people in both secure and insecure partnerships. It includes the viewpoints of both contemporary clinical practice and research.

When I was asked to do this review my first thought was, like many individual psychotherapists, what do I know about couples' psychotherapy? On reflection I realized that I do work with many individuals for whom the issues around their couple relationship can be the focus of their therapy. Exploration of the joys but, sadly, more often the disappointments, preoccupations of hopelessness, the painful dilemmas and longings for intimacy within a relationship can be central concerns. Often these experiences are re-enacted within the therapeutic relationship giving an opportunity to explore their complex unconscious origins. As a psychotherapist whose work is informed by attachment theory, and with a spirit of enquiry and some trepidation I embarked on reading and reviewing this book.

Clulow identifies the aims of this book as twofold. The first is to develop further dialogue between clinical practice and research. He sees participation in research as having the potential for therapeutic effects. He identifies his stance as a couple therapist as one of a collaborator in a research endeavour, the focus of which is the the participants' exploration of their different experiences and subjectivities in the therapeutic relationship.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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