Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To turn on (or off) thumbnails in the list of videos….

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To visualize a snapshot of a Video in PEP Web, simply turn on the Preview feature located above the results list of the Videos Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Mander, G. (2004). ‘The Cord of Life’ - Not Waving, but Drowning: On David Malan's Anorexia, Murder and Suicide: What Can Be Learned from the Tories of Three Remarkable People. Brit. J. Psychother., 20(3):307-313.

(2004). British Journal of Psychotherapy, 20(3):307-313

‘The Cord of Life’ - Not Waving, but Drowning: On David Malan's Anorexia, Murder and Suicide: What Can Be Learned from the Tories of Three Remarkable People

Gertrud Mander

David Malan is best known for the workshop he set up together with Michael Balint as a consultant at the Tavistock clinic in the 1960s to develop a model of short-term focal psychotherapy which he described in his seminal book A Study of Brief Psychotherapy (Malan, 1963). Another book Individual Psychotherapy and the Science of Psychodynamics (1979) became a favourite textbook on psychotherapy trainings in the 1980s. More recently (1997), he has published a study of anorexia, murder and suicide, three conditions which he considers are ‘among the most difficult, dangerous and alarming conditions therapists are likely to be confronted with’ (1997, p. 1). This book is based on three cases from his clinical practice, each of whom he has followed up for more than 20 years, and which for him have a number of themes in common, namely ‘destruction and self-destruction, instinctual needs of enormous intensity, defended against by control and self-punishment’, and the action of what he calls ‘the two cords, pulling in opposite directions, the Cord of Life and the Cord of Death’ (p. 1). Two other themes with patients of this kind he lists as ‘the use of life experience’ and ‘management and not just understanding’. He recommends the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy as a treatment combined with psychiatry and medication, a flexible interdisciplinary approach, offering psychiatric, medical and analytic techniques with the overall aim of a ‘transformation of self-destructiveness into constructive use of experience, developing the capacity for self-analysis, and bringing about a change from compulsion to free choice, from ought to want’ (p.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.