Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To use Evernote for note taking…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Evernote is a general note taking application that integrates with your browser. You can use it to save entire articles, bookmark articles, take notes, and more. It comes in both a free version which has limited synchronization capabilities, and also a subscription version, which raises that limit. You can download Evernote for your computer here. It can be used online, and there’s an app for it as well.

Some of the things you can do with Evernote:

  • Save search-result lists
  • Save complete articles
  • Save bookmarks to articles

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Mann, D. (2016). Transference-Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Clinical Guide by Frank Yeomans, John Clarkin and Otto Kernberg. Published by American Psychiatric Publishing, Washington, 2015; 411 pp; £40.49. Brit. J. Psychother., 32(2):285-287.

(2016). British Journal of Psychotherapy, 32(2):285-287

Transference-Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Clinical Guide by Frank Yeomans, John Clarkin and Otto Kernberg. Published by American Psychiatric Publishing, Washington, 2015; 411 pp; £40.49

Review by:
David Mann

This book is a welcome addition to the library on working with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The emphasis is on what the authors call transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP). Rooted in psychoanalytic thinking, the ambition of the book is to provide ‘a rigorous research methodology and empirical evaluation’. That objective is the strength of the book; in my view it is also its weakness.

TFP is designed for the most difficult patients in the therapist's case-load: patients presenting with BPD. In contrast to say, cognitive behavioural therapy, psychodynamic approaches not only offer symptom relief but also address the underlying structures of the BPD. The authors assert that TFP is a more systematic procedure for psychodynamic work with borderline patients. With that in mind, TFP initially promises to enhance the social and vocational functioning of the patient with BPD, their love lives and their creativity. Once the reader starts to dig deeper into the text, however, such sweeping statements start to be qualified.

The therapeutic treatment and application of TFP is broken down into stages: case selection, the importance of the frame, the development and analysis of the transference; guidelines are given for managing crises, sexual enactments, suicidal presentations and so forth. Indeed, the blurb on the back cover describes the book very well: ‘a remarkable roadmap for clinicians - truly a GPS for TFP that maps the treatment terrain’. In a nutshell, that is this book: it is a manual.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.