Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: Books are sorted alphabetically…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The list of books available on PEP Web is sorted alphabetically, with the exception of Freud’s Collected Works, Glossaries, and Dictionaries. You can find this list in the Books Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Winer, J.A. (2005). Confidentiality: Ethical Perspectives and Clinical Dilemmas edited by Charles Levin, Allannah Furlong, and Mary Kay O'Neil Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press, 2003, 325 pp.. Canadian J. Psychoanal., 13(1):119-122.

(2005). Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis, 13(1):119-122

Confidentiality: Ethical Perspectives and Clinical Dilemmas edited by Charles Levin, Allannah Furlong, and Mary Kay O'Neil Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press, 2003, 325 pp.

Review by:
Jerome A. Winer

Except for extreme and obvious violations of a profession's published principles of ethics, what is unethical behaviour or practice is seldom beyond question. I am reminded of the traditional joke regarding an alleged ethical violation brought before an orthodox rabbi in a small village in Eastern Europe during the nineteenth century. The claimant presented his view of what had happened. The rabbi listened with great care, pondered the matter, and finally broke his silence to say, “You are right.” His opponent, full of affect, presented his view, which was in no way consonant with the first party's claim. The rabbi again pondered the matter with obvious care, and then proclaimed, “You are right!” A neutral observer was dumbfounded and protested, “Rabbi, the two views are totally incompatible. How can they both be right?” After an even longer silence the rabbi said, “You are right, too.” Those who seek resolutions of subtle conflicts and dilemmas about confidentiality will find few in this volume. The apparent plethora of conflicting views does not mean that careful examination of ethical dilemmas is unwarranted, however.

The practice of psychoanalysis has often remained silent on obvious ethical problems. This has been especially true in the case of confidentiality, despite its being an imperative for clinical practice since Hippocrates. Freud himself was notorious for his lack of discretion in this area, as scholarly research has amply disclosed (Grosskurth, 1991; Lynn & Vaillant, 1998).

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.