Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To contact support with questions…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can always contact us directly by sending an email to support@p-e-p.org.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Schlachet, B.C. (1998). Views from the Hurricane: Living with Bipolar Disorder: A Review of An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison; Leaving a Doll's House by Claire Bloom. An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995. 224 pp. and Leaving a Doll's House by Claire Bloom. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 1996. 251 pp.. Contemp. Psychoanal., 34(1):146-151.

(1998). Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 34(1):146-151

Views from the Hurricane: Living with Bipolar Disorder: A Review of An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison; Leaving a Doll's House by Claire Bloom. An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995. 224 pp. and Leaving a Doll's House by Claire Bloom. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 1996. 251 pp.

Barbara Cohn Schlachet, Ph.D.

Upon learning that I was writing this review, my eldest son, who is unfailingly in touch with the ever-changing Zeitgeist, informed me that bipolar disorder is the disease du jour. It has, in fact, become one of those fashionable terms that get used as shorthand descriptions in conversation: “He's bipolar” is like “You're being paranoid” or “neurotic.” I told him that I regret hearing this, because this kind of inclusion into the larger culture trivializes a condition that is serious, and when accurately diagnosed, may be treated by appropriate intervention. For a similar instance of the dangers of popularization, one need only think of “recovered memory” in regard to childhood sexual abuse issues.

My own interest in manic-depressive or bipolar disorder arises primarily from its occurrence in my own family and, of course, from its occurrence in my practice. My own experience has made me wonder whether or not we, as psychoanalysts, are enough attuned to bipolar disorders. Certainly, most of us, during hospital internships and residencies, have come in contact with patients in florid manic states, or in the major depressions that often follow. Yet those people in our clinical practices who describe episodes of rage and irritability, who exhibit a sense of entitlement bordering on the grandiose, who are easily narcissistically wounded, and who swing between idealization and disillusionment in their relationships, are more often diagnosed as narcissistic or borderline personalities.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.