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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Bayles, M. (2016). A review of Screen Relations: The Limits of Computer-Mediated Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy: by Gillian Isaacs Russell. London, England: Karnac Books, 2015. 224 pp.. Contemp. Psychoanal., 52(4):653-659.

(2016). Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 52(4):653-659

A review of Screen Relations: The Limits of Computer-Mediated Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy: by Gillian Isaacs Russell. London, England: Karnac Books, 2015. 224 pp.

Mary Bayles, M.S.W.

It's not the 20th century anymore and the idea that people actually have to physically meet in an office is a passé understanding [of psychoanalytic therapy]. (Fortunati, 2005)

Gillian Isaacs Russell has written an important, well-researched, interdisciplinary book that cogently argues that meeting in the office is anything but passé. Although recognizing that technology infuses every aspect of our 21st-century lives, Isaacs Russell presents strong and persuasive arguments that psychoanalysts should only move from in-office treatment to computer-mediated treatment after careful consideration of the differential impact of these modalities on therapeutic action. An experienced and frequent Skype user herself, Isaacs Russell has been engaged in analyzing and teaching psychoanalysis across continents for over a decade, so she is well-positioned to assess the differences and her intellectual rigor is impressive. Addressing what she sees as the limits and losses in computer-mediated treatment, her book fills a gap in the literature.

In presenting her conclusion that computer-mediated treatments are not functionally equivalent to the treatment of patients who are copresent, Isaacs Russell raises challenging questions that many users of Skype and related technologies may not want to hear, let alone answer.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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