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Riley, D. (1986). Analysis of Transference, vol. 1, Theory and Technique, by Merton M. Gill, New York: IUP, 1982, i + 197 pages, $22.50. Analysis of Transference, vol. 2, Studies of Audio-Recorded Psychoanalytic Sessions, by Merton M. Gill and Irwin Z. Hoffman, New York: IUP, 1982, vii + 241 pages, $22.50.. Free Associations, 1(7):124-127.

(1986). Free Associations, 1(7):124-127

Analysis of Transference, vol. 1, Theory and Technique, by Merton M. Gill, New York: IUP, 1982, i + 197 pages, $22.50. Analysis of Transference, vol. 2, Studies of Audio-Recorded Psychoanalytic Sessions, by Merton M. Gill and Irwin Z. Hoffman, New York: IUP, 1982, vii + 241 pages, $22.50.

Review by:
David Riley

The writings of the author of these slim but cogently argued volumes are much more widely known in North America than in this country. This reviewer is conscious of the dangers of transatlantic evaluations, partly on account of mutual prejudices concerning what are frequently perceived as widely contrasting points of view, both theoretically and clinically. So it is greatly to Gill's credit that he has made this systematic attempt to address publicly what is probably one of the most fertile sources of our private prejudices — the handling of transference in our day-to-day work.

In the first volume, he describes in detail his approach to transference, including as a sub-theme his views on the currently neglected topic (at least in British psychoanalytical writing) of the nature of resistance. Volume 2 illustrates his point of view with transcribed single sessions from nine different patients.

He begins by stating his dissatisfaction with much current clinical practice, arguing that there is insufficient emphasis given to the here and now, compared to (for example) genetic reconstruction. From this point on this reviewer found himself wondering to whom the book is addressed.

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