Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly go to the Table of Volumes from any article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To quickly go to the Table of Volumes from any article, click on the banner for the journal at the top of the article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Scott, W.C. (1988). Repairing broken links between the unconscious, sleep and instinct: and the conscious, waking and instinct. Free Associations, 1(12):84-91.

(1988). Free Associations, 1(12):84-91

Repairing broken links between the unconscious, sleep and instinct: and the conscious, waking and instinct

W. Clifford M. Scott

Dement (1986), doyen of sleep research in the United States and now chairman of the Association of Professional Sleep Societies, recently wrote: ‘Sleep Disorders Medicine is being practised, in one form or another, all over the United States, in thousands of places … Our professional standards must be clearly defined and adjusted for the future.’

For years problems studied were discussed as ‘sleep problems’ but gradually they came to be discussed as ‘sleep—wake problems’, as the descriptions of being partly awake while asleep, and partly asleep while awake, have become more complex.

If we search for and find lost links between sleep and the unconscious, and waking and the conscious, we may come to talk more about the relationships between the instincts of sleep and waking, their fusions, their conflicts, the varieties of normal sleep at different ages and in different situations, and the varieties of normal waking at different ages and in different situations, as well as what we wake up to, and what we are able to do only when awake.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.