Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To keep track of most cited articles…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can always keep track of the Most Cited Journal Articles on PEP Web by checking the PEP Section found on the homepage.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Oakley, C. (1995). Noreen O'Connor and Joanna Ryan Wild Desires and Mistaken Identities, Lesbianism and Psychoanalysis. London: Virago, 1993, 315 pages, pb £12.99. Free Associations, 5(3):377-380.

(1995). Free Associations, 5(3):377-380

Noreen O'Connor and Joanna Ryan Wild Desires and Mistaken Identities, Lesbianism and Psychoanalysis. London: Virago, 1993, 315 pages, pb £12.99

Review by:
Chris Oakley

Let us, just for a moment, consider the position of a young woman … or in this instance, two young women, whose sexual orientation is lesbian, who also find themselves drawn to psychoanalysis. After all, why not? From a certain perspective it has, this discourse of psychoanalysis, an allure, a veritable charm … indeed it would appear to privilege a quest for truth, set in the context of an insistent challenging of taboos, and so might be thought to allow for the possibility of a challenge to be mounted against prevailing homophobic attitudes that so stalk our culture. Or at the very least provide a venue for a serious interrogation of the issues involved. Surely this is neither a case of a ‘wild desire’ or of ‘mistaken identity’.

Now as some of us are dimly aware this psychoanalysis has come to disappoint; rather than a source of emancipation … and it is not that just such a potential is not still in play … what now goes with the territory is a pernicious resistance to diversity. However a word of warning here … just as the authors of this book so successfully avoid the homogenisation of homosexuality, and persistently underline the plurality of its possibilities, right at this moment am I not in danger of becoming involved in some superimposition of a unifying vision of psychoanalysis? The very notion of the ‘discourse of psychoanalysis’ or of the ‘psychoanalytic community’ runs the risk of a suppression of difference. In other words it would be absurd to assume that all psychoanalysts or psychoanalytic psychotherapists will be tarred with the same brush. Nevertheless what haunts the scene is an insistent conflation of psychic health and heterosexuality.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.