Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To find a specific quote…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Trying to find a specific quote? Go to the Search section, and write it using quotation marks in “Search for Words or Phrases in Context.”

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ihanus, J. (2003). Paul Roazen. Political Theory and the Psychology of the Unconscious. Freud, J. S. Mill, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Fromm, Bettelheim, and Erikson. London, Open Gate Press, 2000.. Int. Forum Psychoanal., 12(4):275-276.
    

(2003). International Forum of Psychoanalysis, 12(4):275-276

Paul Roazen. Political Theory and the Psychology of the Unconscious. Freud, J. S. Mill, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Fromm, Bettelheim, and Erikson. London, Open Gate Press, 2000.

Review by:
Juhani Ihanus, Ph.D.

Psychoanalytic theory has not been extensively applied to political studies. Many difficulties have arisen in efforts to study and recognise unconscious processes in politicians and political action — and also in the “internal policy” of the psychoanalytic movement itself. Freud ventured into some speculations in this field. Paul Roazen was a pioneer with his first book Freud: Political and Social Thought (1968; later editions 1986 and 1999), in which he elucidated Freud's contributions to the political and social sciences. In Political Theory and the Psychology of the Unconscious, which is one of three works from his good harvest year of 2000, Roazen aims to show that psychoanalysis is part of the great chain of traditional conversation in political thought, extending to the new millennium.

John Stuart Mill as a critic of Bentham, his father James Mill, and utilitarianism in general, is positioned by Roazen as a major political philosopher who reached awareness of psychological “depths”, of “the internal culture of the individual” (p. 9). Mill saw a community based on emotions rather than primarily on reason and self-interest. As a somewhat resentful, intellectually reared child, he questioned the rationalistic premises of liberal thought. In this criticism of traditional liberalism, he was later followed by Nietzsche and Dostoevsky, and even by Freud who advocated that the child is in the midst and lives on within the adult.

Roazen finds resemblances rather than differences between Nietzsche and Freud.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.