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Tip: Books are sorted alphabetically…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The list of books available on PEP Web is sorted alphabetically, with the exception of Freud’s Collected Works, Glossaries, and Dictionaries. You can find this list in the Books Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Akhtar, S. (2010). The Relational Origins of Prejudice - A Convergence of Psychoanalytic and Social Cognitive Perspectives By Ron B. Aviram Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson, 2009, 145 pp., $ 50.00. Int. J. Appl. Psychoanal. Stud., 7(4):343-347.

(2010). International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies, 7(4):343-347

The Relational Origins of Prejudice - A Convergence of Psychoanalytic and Social Cognitive Perspectives By Ron B. Aviram Lanham, MD: Jason Aronson, 2009, 145 pp., $ 50.00

Salman Akhtar

A “good news-bad news” sort-of communication is best started with the latter since doing so assures that matters will end on a cordial note. Allow me therefore to begin with the weaknesses of Ron Aviram's book though, I must admit, wincing a bit since the author cites me quite affectionately. That said, I must proceed further. First among the weaknesses of Aviram's book is the ill-advised title of a chapter “The Relational Origins of Prejudice” in a book that is titled The Relational Origins of Prejudice. It makes the reader do the colloquial “double take” and wonder whether the other chapters are redundant. The next problem is Aviram's writing style, which has a peculiarly adhesive quality; a point that has been made is repeated over and over again.

His language also leaves much to be desired. An efficient copy-editor might have cleaned up things in this regard but it seems that Aviram lacked the benefit of such fine-tuning. As a result, one comes across grammatically sloppy sentences throughout his book. Aviram's declaration that “Freud's major statement about the relationship between the individual and the large group is written in his …” (p. 130, emphasis added), that “Erich Fromm was a colleague of Adorno and a part of the Frankfurt School …” (p. 17, emphasis added), and that “Kohut's perspective is not uncommon for clinicians who are oriented toward and expert with, individual and interpersonal dynamics …” (p.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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