Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly return from a journal’s Table of Contents to the Table of Volumes…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can return with one click from a journal’s Table of Contents (TOC) to the Table of Volumes simply by clicking on “Volume n” at the top of the TOC (where n is the volume number).

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

F., J.C. (1924). Social Change with Respect to Culture and Original Nature: By William Fielding Ogburn, Professor of Sociology at Barnard College. (B. W. Huebsch, New York, 1922, pp. xi + 365. Price $2.00.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 5:108-110.

(1924). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 5:108-110

Social Change with Respect to Culture and Original Nature: By William Fielding Ogburn, Professor of Sociology at Barnard College. (B. W. Huebsch, New York, 1922, pp. xi + 365. Price $2.00.)

Review by:
J. C. F.

This is a thoughtful and suggestive book, which deserves to be widely read among students of social psychology. Though abounding in significant statements of fact and interesting points of view, there is in it a very refreshing absence of dogmatism or onesidedness—two frequent vices which are particularly ill-becoming in a very youthful science, such as sociology.

The book is divided into five parts. In the first two parts the author treats of 'The Social Heritage and the Original Nature of Man' and of 'Social Evolution' respectively. He here emphasizes the importance of culture (taken in a wide sense to include the material aspects of civilization) as compared with original nature as determinants of social change. There is, he maintains, a rather widespread tendency to overstress the purely biological causes of change, and he makes some interesting suggestions as to the probable reasons for this overestimation of biological and the corresponding underestimation of cultural factors. Human nature, he is inclined to think, has changed but little since the last ice age; but human culture has changed enormously and is accumulating rapidly. The rate at which culture advances at first suggests the compound interest curve, but further examination shows it to be more complex than this. The frequency with which similar inventions are made independently at or about the same time is further impressive evidence of the influence of culture, as distinct from that of native ability, in promoting social change.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.