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Wilson, A.C. (1924). Clinical: H. Somerville. The War Anxiety Neurotic of the Present Day: His 'Dizzy Bouts' and Hallucinations. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 1923, Vol. III, p. 309.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 5:366-367.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Clinical: H. Somerville. The War Anxiety Neurotic of the Present Day: His 'Dizzy Bouts' and Hallucinations. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 1923, Vol. III, p. 309.

(1924). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 5:366-367

Clinical: H. Somerville. The War Anxiety Neurotic of the Present Day: His 'Dizzy Bouts' and Hallucinations. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 1923, Vol. III, p. 309.

A. Cyril Wilson

Dr. Somerville says that 'dizzy bouts', which he characterizes as the principal mental symptoms of a war anxiety neurotic, are to be taken 'as sudden attacks of extreme fear, originating in an affect transference from a war incident to a present occasion, amplified by a fusing of this affect to that attached to a deeper strongly repressed complex, the like of which is present in the unconscious of everyone, a complex of which the father is the central figure'. He adds: 'It is also useful to look upon them as an exacerbation of the patient's general condition of purely suppressed fear'.

He divides hallucinations mainly into 'visual' and 'aural'. He connects visual hallucinations with the Oedipus complex; aural hallucinations with the homosexual complex.

With regard to aural hallucinations, he states that they are more closely associated with the psychotic condition than those of the visual type. He divides them into hostile voices and those not so, and suggests that both sorts 'have their origin in a homosexual complex'. (He refers to Freud's and Ferenczi's work in this connection.) The former corresponds with Freud's 'I hate him', and the latter with the 'I love him', phase. Dr. Somerville says he is in some doubt whether or not a neurotic patient can pass into a psychotic condition. He is inclined to believe

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he can, but maintains, however, that in his experience hallucinations, by themselves and unaccompanied by signs of fixation, are not to be taken as indicating a psychosis—that they tend to clear up under psychotherapy; but that if there is evidence of fixation the outlook is not so good.

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Article Citation

Wilson, A.C. (1924). Clinical. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 5:366-367

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