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F., J.C. (1924). The Daydream. A Study in Development: By George H. Green, B.Sc. (Lond.), B.Litt. (Oxon.), Lecturer in Education in the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. (University of London Press, 1923. Pp. 304. Price 6 s.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 5:386-388.

(1924). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 5:386-388

The Daydream. A Study in Development: By George H. Green, B.Sc. (Lond.), B.Litt. (Oxon.), Lecturer in Education in the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. (University of London Press, 1923. Pp. 304. Price 6 s.)

Review by:
J. C. F.

This book continues and develops the study of the daydream that was begun in the author's previous work on Psycho-Analysis in the Classroom (reviewed in this JOURNAL, Vol. III, p. 237). Its principal contention is that the observation of daydreams in children affords a useful clue to the existence of certain important stages of development. These stages are characterized as follows: in the first (up to the age of three) Nutrition is the chief interest; in the second (from about three to ten) interest in the Self is the most prominent; in the third (from about ten to puberty) Gregariousness becomes important; while in the fourth (at puberty) Sex plays the leading rôle. To the last three of these developmental stages there correspond certain well-marked types of daydream. During the second stage a characteristic form of daydream is concerned with an 'imaginary companion' who possesses a variety of useful functions, e.g. helping to gratify and develop the incipient gregarious tendencies, fulfilling vicariously the child's own prohibited, repressed or impeded desires, affording a suitable object for the child's wish to exercise authority, and providing an ever-willing admirer of the child's accomplishments. Corresponding to the third stage—in which more purely egoistic activities give place to group games and group exploits—there is a 'team' phantasy, in which remarkable experiences are undergone by a group of adventurers, the individual daydreamer himself being merely primus inter pares.

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