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Sharpe, E.F. (1925). Psycho-Analysis and Aesthetics: By Charles Baudouin. Translated from the French by Eden and Cedar Paul. (Allen & Unwin, London, 1924. Pp. 328. Price 16 s.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 6:79-81.

(1925). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 6:79-81

Psycho-Analysis and Aesthetics: By Charles Baudouin. Translated from the French by Eden and Cedar Paul. (Allen & Unwin, London, 1924. Pp. 328. Price 16 s.

Review by:
E. F. Sharpe

In the Preface the translators claim for this book that it 'is an application of psycho-analysis to the theory of æsthetics as illustrated by a detailed study of Verhaeren's works'. The 'interpretation Freud has supplied for dreams Baudouin achieves for the imagery of the artistic creator.' Psycho-Analysis and Aesthetics solves the 'riddle of artistic appreciation'. Baudouin 'claims no merit for having brought our analysis to so satisfactory

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a conclusion and for having found so faithful an expression of Verhaeren's personal life in the manifold symbols we encounter in his work'. These impressive statements in the Preface and the author's satisfaction in the conclusion may carry weight with popular exponents of psycho-analysis, but students of the subject will find nothing in this volume that will help to elucidate the 'riddle of æsthetic appreciation' except the copious extracts from the poet's works.

The author shows no knowledge of the fundamental conceptions of Freudian theory, albeit it is claimed that this book makes an achievement that parallels Freud's Interpretation of Dreams. A few illustrations will suffice to show this ignorance.

'Unconscious' and 'subconscious' are everywhere used as equivalents. Page 22: We are told that the reason for the alarm experienced in a nightmare is due to the displacement of affective stress on to a harmless object (in the dream) from the real cause of anxiety (in the present). Page 23: 'We rarely dream

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