Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see author affiliation information in an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To see author affiliation and contact information (as available) in an article, simply click on the Information icon next to the author’s name in every journal article.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Riggall, R.M. (1926). General: E. Pickworth Farrow. A Method of Self-Analysis. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 1926, Vol. V, p. 106.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 7:248-249.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: General: E. Pickworth Farrow. A Method of Self-Analysis. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 1926, Vol. V, p. 106.

(1926). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 7:248-249

General: E. Pickworth Farrow. A Method of Self-Analysis. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 1926, Vol. V, p. 106.

Robert M. Riggall

- 248 -

The author claims that by his method of self-analysis he has been able to recover from the ill-effects of a large number of former repressions and complexes. He states that he has recollected and removed most of his Oedipus complex and has been able to recover an incident occurring about the age of six months. He considers that a transference relationship to an analyst was unnecessary in his case and states that the therapeutic results were better than those obtained from his two previous analytical experiences with qualified analysts. The method employed was to write down whatever occurred to the conscious mind from second to second during the analytical period. It was found that the writing of intruding and interrupting thoughts did not obliterate the original association but enriched it on its recurrence. The note-taking was found to be preferable to dictating free associations to a recording machine. The author regards his method as particularly applicable to those shy people who find it difficult to relate their intimate thoughts to another. He states that it differs from morbid introspection and renders the mind clearer, reducing nervousness by dissipating repressed emotion. The removal of this emotion is painful and requires great determination. Examples of free association which revealed the origin of his interest in antiques (cleared up after eleven hours) and astronomy (cleared up after seventeen hours) are given.

- 249 -

Article Citation

Riggall, R.M. (1926). General. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 7:248-249

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.