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Tip: To review the bibliography…

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It is always useful to review an article’s bibliography and references to get a deeper understanding of the psychoanalytic concepts and theoretical framework in it.

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Eder, M.D. (1929). Two Essays on Analytical Psychology: By C. G. Jung, M.D., LL.D. Authorized translation by H. G. & C. F. Baynes. (London: Baillière, Tindall & Cox. Pp. 280. Price 10 s. 6 d. net.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 10:468-470.

(1929). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 10:468-470

Two Essays on Analytical Psychology: By C. G. Jung, M.D., LL.D. Authorized translation by H. G. & C. F. Baynes. (London: Baillière, Tindall & Cox. Pp. 280. Price 10 s. 6 d. net.)

Review by:
M. D. Eder

Jung quotes approvingly, and not for the first time, Anatole France's Les savants ne sont pas curieux. We recall Jung's fine exhortation of earlier days, addressed to those who would sound the human mind to cast aside the scholar's gown and to go forth and dwell among men and women at court and in the cottage, in the market-place and in the prison, in the monastery and in the brothel. But alas, Jung has long since himself become one of those incurious savants. He has all that savant's satisfaction in a label, all that savant's distaste for what does not lend itself to ready classification. Jung now seems content if he can stick a pin with the appropriate label, intravert, extravert, anima, animus, with a neat balancing of qualities into the museum specimen. The doom is pronounced once the specimen can be properly ticketed; if the specimen is so unfortunate as not to fit into one of the psychological types it is denied admission into the museum; the refusal is of course based on the soundest ethical grounds and receives the applause of the happily docketed intraverts and extraverts.

There is no necessity at this time of day to refute at length Jung's version of psycho-analysis; he assumes for instance (p. 128), that the Freudian unconscious is a kind of sack whose contents can be entirely shaken out and that it could produce nothing beyond what had already been known and accepted by consciousness. He passes over Freud's clearly-expressed concept that ideas, etc. belong in the first instance to the system Ucs, and that some of these pass into the system PCs and Cs whilst others are incapable of leaving the system Ucs (bewusstseinsunfähig).

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