Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web can be reviewed at any time. Just click the “See full statistics” link located at the end of the Most Popular Journal Articles list in the PEP Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Gillespie, W.H. (1933). Dreams: Paul Federn. 'Das Ichgefühl im Traume.' Internationale Zeitschrift für Psychoanalyse, 1932, Bd. XVIII, S. 145–170.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 14:507-508.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Dreams: Paul Federn. 'Das Ichgefühl im Traume.' Internationale Zeitschrift für Psychoanalyse, 1932, Bd. XVIII, S. 145–170.

(1933). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 14:507-508

Dreams: Paul Federn. 'Das Ichgefühl im Traume.' Internationale Zeitschrift für Psychoanalyse, 1932, Bd. XVIII, S. 145–170.

W. H. Gillespie

In his previous work on the ego-feeling, the subjective experience of the ego-functions, Federn shewed that it is a sensation or feeling, and that ego-feeling may be bodily or mental, active or passive, complete or partial. He supposes it to be the primary narcissistic cathexis of the ego.

He compares dream states with those of estrangement and depersonalization, and shews that ego-feeling is lacking in both. Correct ego-consciousness is always present in the dream, but a personal feeling exists only for the mental processes, the body being ignored in most cases. This involves dissociation of ego-functions. The mental ego-feeling is usually passive in dreams. In a patient's somnambulistic dream the body-ego-feeling was very vivid and was felt as a burden opposing the intended action, which was one ordained by the super-ego. The same thing occurs in inhibition dreams, but there the limb to be moved

- 507 -

is felt as being outside the ego. The somnambulistic dream = I ought to, the inhibition dream = I may not.

Active body-ego-feeling appears when the dreamer assents to the dream-wish with his will. A movement carried out without body-ego-feeling emphasizes not the action but the ability to perform it.

The presence or absence of body-ego-feeling, and its nature, indicate the attitude of the ego and the super-ego and thus represent the auxiliary verbs: will, ought, must, may, and can. The will is the application of the total active ego-cathexis to given actions, and Federn claims to have amplified the dream theory by shewing that willing can be recognized in the dream.

- 508 -

Article Citation

Gillespie, W.H. (1933). Dreams. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 14:507-508

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.