Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To receive notifications about new content…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Want to receive notifications about new content in PEP Web?   For more information about this feature, click here

To sign up to PEP Web Alert for weekly emails with new content updates click click here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Riviere, J. (1934). New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis: By Sigm. Freud, M.D., LL.D. (The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis, London, 1933. Pp. 240. Price 10 s. 6 d. net.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 15:329-339.
    

(1934). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 15:329-339

New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis: By Sigm. Freud, M.D., LL.D. (The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis, London, 1933. Pp. 240. Price 10 s. 6 d. net.)

Review by:
Joan Riviere

A new book by Freud means much to every analyst; and to the many true lovers of his genius, of his personality and the magic of his words any book from him will be a delight, even if, as he claims, it contains no important additions to our knowledge. Of his rare qualities one is his variety. Three years ago appeared his book on civilization, with its huge scope, its originality, its magnificence; now after that great symphony the present volume is like a suite of simple melodies.

All Freud's work may be said to have been addressed to the lay public as well as to specialists—we know the reason—but the original Lectures were specifically composed for such an audience. He has been led now to seek that audience once again, and we shall see that he has been impelled to round off his earlier presentation of psycho-analysis by a picture of his views as they stand to-day. He resumes with an incomparable clarity and lucidity the immense field of work in the intervening years; but analysts will note a selection of topics, the omission of some important considerations and a new and recurrent emphasis on certain aspects, notably, for instance, on external causative factors. As compared with the earlier Lectures, this book has less of the atmosphere of immediate living contact with the subject discussed. Theories and conclusions were ever in plenty, since they are the essence of Freud's productive mind; but whereas a close and vivid relation to observation—a contact

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.