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Silverberg, W.V. (1936). General: Nicholas Gotten and Clarence A. Patten. 'The Delusions of Spiritism.' American Journal of Psychiatry, May, 1934, XIII, 6.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 17:115-116.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: General: Nicholas Gotten and Clarence A. Patten. 'The Delusions of Spiritism.' American Journal of Psychiatry, May, 1934, XIII, 6.

(1936). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 17:115-116

General: Nicholas Gotten and Clarence A. Patten. 'The Delusions of Spiritism.' American Journal of Psychiatry, May, 1934, XIII, 6.

William V. Silverberg

After some discussion of the history of spiritualism in general and in the United States in particular, the authors give an abstract of the history of a young woman of thirty-three whose father, economically an unsuccessful man, had developed a spiritualistic religious philosophy. He singled out his daughter at an early age as 'psychic', and at five or six she had already a rich fantasy life in which she would converse with imaginary persons and animals. The psychosis, which the authors consider schizophrenic, was delusional and consisted in the belief that a certain man, several years her senior, had died and become a 'spirit', and in this form was continually visiting her, making sexual proposals and attacks,

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and trying to take her soul from her body for sexual purposes. The authors regard this delusion as an expression of the patient's incestuous fixation. The implication is that this signified a bilateral fixation of father and daughter which led the daughter to reject the real world (she was suspicious of all but a few individuals) and to express her conflict in spiritualistic terms.

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Article Citation

Silverberg, W.V. (1936). General. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 17:115-116

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