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Dooley, L. (1936). Clinical: John M. Dorsey. 'The Psychology of the Person who Stutters.' The Psychoanalytic Review, January, 1935, Vol. XXII, No. 1, pp. 25–35.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 17:119.
    
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Clinical: John M. Dorsey. 'The Psychology of the Person who Stutters.' The Psychoanalytic Review, January, 1935, Vol. XXII, No. 1, pp. 25–35.

(1936). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 17:119

Clinical: John M. Dorsey. 'The Psychology of the Person who Stutters.' The Psychoanalytic Review, January, 1935, Vol. XXII, No. 1, pp. 25–35.

Lucile Dooley

Speech was originally an 'egocentric creative physioplastic act' phonetically imitating experience. In the normal personality there is an adequate balance of 'take-in' (oral), 'give-out' (urethral) and 'hang-on' (anal) functions. Stuttering indicates an under-emphasis of urethral libido cathexis in its onset, an over-emphasis of anal libido cathexis in its maintenance.

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Article Citation

Dooley, L. (1936). Clinical. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 17:119

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