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Brierley, M. (1950). Contributions to Psycho-Analysis 1921–1945: By Melanie Klein. (No. 37, The International Psycho-Analytical Library, edited by Ernest Jones, London: 1948, The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis. Pp. 416. 21 s. net.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 31:209-211.

(1950). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 31:209-211

Contributions to Psycho-Analysis 1921–1945: By Melanie Klein. (No. 37, The International Psycho-Analytical Library, edited by Ernest Jones, London: 1948, The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis. Pp. 416. 21 s. net.)

Review by:
Marjorie Brierley

In a friendly Introduction to this book, Ernest Jones alludes to the 'commotion' engendered in the British Psycho-Analytical Society by the work of Melanie Klein. This disturbance resulted from the development of two extreme pro- and antigroups which according to this Introduction, 'between them vociferously, and therefore easily, restricted the quieter scientific endeavours of cooler members.' These non-partisans, amongst whom the present writer is to be numbered, formed an unorganized 'middle group' which drew fire from both extremes but continued its unspectacular efforts to view the new work in rational perspective. Ernest Jones himself regards as 'grossly exaggerated' the charge that Melanie Klein's work is incompatible with Freud's, though he would not regard such incompatibility as decisive if experience supported her conclusions, since the further development of psycho-analysis necessitates advance beyond the limits set by Freud himself. Ernest Jones summarizes and comments on some of the more striking of Melanie Klein's contributions, namely:—

a. The development of the play-technique of child-analysis which enabled her to confirm Freud's inferences about the unconscious life of the child and pursue these further, concluding, for instance, that

b. Cannibalistic and other sadistic phantasies, which had been traced to the age of three, 'occur during the so-called cannibalistic stage of infancy itself, which after all seems what one would have expected!'

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