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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Greenacre, P. (1951). Anxiety in Pregnancy and Childbirth: By Henriette R. Klein, Howard W. Potter and Ruth B. Dyk. (New York: Paul B. Hoeber, Inc., Medical Book Department of Harper and Brothers, 1950.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 32:137-138.

(1951). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 32:137-138

Anxiety in Pregnancy and Childbirth: By Henriette R. Klein, Howard W. Potter and Ruth B. Dyk. (New York: Paul B. Hoeber, Inc., Medical Book Department of Harper and Brothers, 1950.)

Review by:
Phyllis Greenacre

This is a 'psychosomatic medicine monograph' written by a psycho-analyst, a psychiatrist and a psychiatric social worker. The study was carried on at the Long Island College Hospital in 1945–46, and initially included all primiparous patients admitted to the maternity service at that time; but data were sufficiently complete for only twenty-seven patients (64 per cent) of the group to be worthy of final correlative study.

To this reviewer it seems that the study is too general for the limited number of cases, which are obviously selected not by the authors but by the circumstances of clinic attendance and perhaps by the time (immediately on the close of the war).

There are some interesting, seemingly incidental observations, e.g. that all of the women who (consciously) strongly desired their babies wanted to nurse them, while the others predominantly did not wish to do so; that the two unmarried women who were most rejecting of their babies had compromised with the expectation of having girls, and were openly resentful of having boys. The authors believe that in the group in general preferential expectation regarding the sex of the child was not strong.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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