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Brierley, M. (1951). Collected Papers: Vol. V. By Sigmund Freud. Edited by James Strachey. No. 37, The International Psycho-Analytical Library, edited by Ernest Jones. (London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis, 1950. Pp. 396. Price 25 s. net.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 32:247-247.

(1951). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 32:247-247

Collected Papers: Vol. V. By Sigmund Freud. Edited by James Strachey. No. 37, The International Psycho-Analytical Library, edited by Ernest Jones. (London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis, 1950. Pp. 396. Price 25 s. net.)

Review by:
Marjorie Brierley

This volume completes the series of Freud's Collected Papers published in the International Psycho-Analytical Library. Its contents vary widely both in date and in subject matter, as the sub-title, 'Miscellaneous Papers, 1888–1938', implies. It includes papers written after the publication of Volume IV (1925) and gathers together a number of earlier ones omitted from Volumes I to IV, e.g. several Prefaces, the two Encyclopoedia Britannica articles, and some dozen papers which now appear for the first time in English. The new and the revised translations conform to the exceptionally high standard we have come to associate with the work of James Strachey.

Readers unfamiliar with the German originals will be particularly interested in the new translations. The first consists of three preparatory drafts of the 1893 paper, 'On the Psychical Mechanism of Hysterical Phenomena', which appeared in Collected Papers, Vol. I. These diafts reveal Freud's mind at work on the initial clues afforded by his cases and show clearly the penetrative character of his insight and the firmness of his mental grasp. A second new translation, 'A Case of Successful Treatment by Hypnotism' (1893), marks his recognition of mental conflict in terms of 'counter-will'. It also contains a delightfully human description of his youthful reaction to the successfully treated patient's lack of appreciation: 'I found it hard to understand, however, as well as annoying, that no reference was ever made to my remarkable achievement.

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