Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web can be reviewed at any time. Just click the “See full statistics” link located at the end of the Most Popular Journal Articles list in the PEP Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Anthony, E.J. (1954). Social Science and Psychotherapy for Children: By Otto Pollak and Collaborators. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1952. Pp. 242. $4.00.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 35:375.
    

(1954). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 35:375

Social Science and Psychotherapy for Children: By Otto Pollak and Collaborators. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1952. Pp. 242. $4.00.)

Review by:
E. J. Anthony

It is very doubtful whether a book with this orientation could have been written in Britain at the present time. It was inevitable, however, that in America, that land of perpetual trial and error, novel explorations of this type would be made.

In 1948, the Russell Sage Foundation announced its decision to devote its resources to the cultivation of closer and more effective relationships between researching and practising groups in the social field. This volume relates the history over two years of one such relationship. It describes the results of collaboration between a 'social science consultant' (an expert as yet non-existent here) and the psycho-analytically-oriented child guidance institution of the Jewish Board of Guardians in New York.

The social scientist brought into the clinic with him nine specific social science concepts—the family of orientation (a larger family than the psycho-analyst is used to dealing with), social interaction, socialization, cultural relativity and culture conflict (here, the problem of the Jew in unorthodox surroundings), roles and status, youth culture, and the reinforcement in stimulus-response learning. The governing formula was contained in a synthesis of the situational and psycho-analytic approaches. The good intention was to broaden the scope of therapy and define the limitations set by the environment. The emphasis was on width rather than depth, and on current experience rather than on transference. The therapist was to be made aware of a larger world outside.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.