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Jaques, E. (1957). The Trickster: By Paul Radin, with commentaries by Karl Kerényi and C. G. Jung. (London: Routledge, 1956. Pp. xi + 211. 21s.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 38:429-430.

(1957). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 38:429-430

The Trickster: By Paul Radin, with commentaries by Karl Kerényi and C. G. Jung. (London: Routledge, 1956. Pp. xi + 211. 21s.)

Review by:
Elliott Jaques

This book by the American anthropologist, Paul Radin, is of importance to psycho-analysts. It describes the American Indian version of one of the most basic of all human myths—the myth of the trickster. The trickster is a primitive being with a dual character—he is sly and stupid at the same time. His slyness shows in his playing pranks and cunning tricks on others. His stupidity expresses itself in jesting and buffoonery which causes him to look ridiculous and to be laughed at. This character appears in myths of all types; he is epitomized by Hermes in Greek mythology and by Till Eulenspiegel in the Middle Ages.

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