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Brierley, M. (1959). Instinctive Behavior. The Development of a Modern Concept: Translated and edited by Claire H. Schiller. Introduction by Karl S. Lashley. Contributors: D. J. Kuenen, Konrad Lorenz, Nicholas Tinbergen, Paul H. Schiller, and Jacob von Uexküll. (New York: International Universities Press, 1957. Pp. xix + 328. $7.50.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 40:151.

(1959). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 40:151

Instinctive Behavior. The Development of a Modern Concept: Translated and edited by Claire H. Schiller. Introduction by Karl S. Lashley. Contributors: D. J. Kuenen, Konrad Lorenz, Nicholas Tinbergen, Paul H. Schiller, and Jacob von Uexküll. (New York: International Universities Press, 1957. Pp. xix + 328. $7.50.)

Review by:
Marjorie Brierley

This book is intended primarily to supply American psychologists with fuller information about the work of European ethologists. It presents the development of their concept of instinctive behaviour by excellent translations of monographs in chronological order from Uexküll, 1934, to Lorenz, 1952. As Karl S. Lashley says in his Introduction, 'The study of animal behavior during the present century has developed along two distinct lines, the products of professional psychologists in America and of zoologists in Europe.' American workers have concentrated mainly on laboratory experiments on learning, whereas the Europeans have been concerned with problems of the whole behaviour of animals in their natural environment or in captivity. In a Preface, Tinbergen considers these differing approaches, each having its own 'merits and shortcomings'. He is of opinion that the lack of fusion between the two is not only due to 'difference in interest' but to 'sheer ignorance of each other's work', caused in part by language difficulties, not the least of these being differences in technical vocabulary. This volume should do much to resolve these problems. The book is illustrated and contains a useful bibliography.

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