Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To contact support with questions…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can always contact us directly by sending an email to support@p-e-p.org.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Klauber, J. (1967). The Development of the Mind: By Jeanne Lampl-de Groot. (New York: Int. Univ. Press, 1965; London: Hogarth and Institute of Psycho-Analysis, 1966. Pp. 373. 45s.). Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 48:122-122.

(1967). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 48:122-122

The Development of the Mind: By Jeanne Lampl-de Groot. (New York: Int. Univ. Press, 1965; London: Hogarth and Institute of Psycho-Analysis, 1966. Pp. 373. 45s.)

Review by:
John Klauber

This collection of papers leaves one in no doubt as to the massive contribution which Jeanne Lampl-de Groot has made to psycho-analysis. The papers which are most original, such as those on "The Evolution of the Oedipus Complex in Women" (1927) or on "Masochism and Narcissism" (1937) at the same time display a high capacity for integration of knowledge—of theoretical exactitude with clinical insight, of preoedipal development with the crystallization of pathology in the phallic phase, of psycho-analysis with other branches of psychology or with biology. The contributions, theoretical and clinical alike, are marked by a striving for systematic clarity. Apart from an interval for the war years, Lampl-de Groot's productivity has been steady for more than thirty years.

Though most of the papers concern some aspect of the development of the mind the title of the book does not quite succeed in suggesting the contents. It is a collection of papers for the most part concerned with aspects of the development of the mind but not a systematic exposition. To some extent, as the publishers say, it is a guide to the development of psycho-analysis. The pre-war contributions largely concern the problems of feminine development and of masochism. Lampl-de Groot shows great sensibility for the small child's awareness of its smallness, and it was her major contribution to enlarge the understanding of the girl's castration complex, previously based on anatomical differences, in terms of a convincing psychology of disappointment based also on the inevitable failure of her active object-seeking relationship with the mother.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.