Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see papers related to the one you are viewing…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When there are articles or videos related to the one you are viewing, you will see a related papers icon next to the title, like this: RelatedPapers32Final3For example:

2015-11-06_09h28_31

Click on it and you will see a bibliographic list of papers that are related (including the current one). Related papers may be papers which are commentaries, responses to commentaries, erratum, and videos discussing the paper. Since they are not part of the original source material, they are added by PEP editorial staff, and may not be marked as such in every possible case.

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Stoller, R.J. (1975). The Language of Psycho-Analysis: By J. Laplanche and J.-B. Pontalis. Translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith. London: Hogarth Press; New York: Norton. 1973. Pp. 510.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 56:103-104.

(1975). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 56:103-104

The Language of Psycho-Analysis: By J. Laplanche and J.-B. Pontalis. Translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith. London: Hogarth Press; New York: Norton. 1973. Pp. 510.

Review by:
Robert J. Stoller

This is an outstanding book, one of the great works of encyclopedic scholarship—like the editing of the Standard Edition or Fenichel's Theory of Neurosis —that psychoanalysis needs in order to consolidate its fundamental propositions. The authors have taken the key concepts of psychoanalysis—clinical and theoretical—and, in spare, essential paragraphs, define each of these almost 300 terms, describe its implications, link it with the appropriate other concepts of the field, indicate the clinical material from which the concept grows, review the way its meaning was modified over the years, and quote the crucial phrases—with bibliographic citation—that precisely mark the meanings and nuances. They have done what they quietly promise:

We have deliberately chosen to analyse the conceptual equipment of psycho-analysis—i.e. the whole set of concepts which it has gradually evolved in order to account for its own discoveries. This book deals, not with everything that psycho-analysis seeks to explain, but with the tools it uses in doing so … Our commentary has striven to dispel or at any rate to make plain the ambiguities of the principal notions, to expose their contradictory aspects.

This is not a dictionary or glossary; by no means are the authors anonymous in their choice of quotations, underlining of themes, isolating problems and emphasizing the ambiguous; they give an excitement that lifts this work out of scrupulous, diligent, honourable, dull cataloguing to a classic of metapsychology.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.