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Prior to searching a specific psychoanalytic concept, you may first want to review The Language of Psycho-Analysis written by Laplanche & Pontalis. You can access it directly by clicking here.

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Sashin, J.I. Eldred, S.H. Van Amerongen, S.T. (1975). A Search for Predictive Factors in Institute Supervised Cases: A Retrospective Study of 183 Cases from 1959–1966 at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 56:343-359.

(1975). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 56:343-359

A Search for Predictive Factors in Institute Supervised Cases: A Retrospective Study of 183 Cases from 1959–1966 at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute

Jerome I. Sashin, Stanley H. Eldred and Suzanne T. Van Amerongen

Kernberg et al.(1972) recently reported that of all the patients studied in their psychotherapy research project, those patients who had the greatest improvement were those who had been treated by psychoanalysis. This finding supports the long-standing clinical impression that for certain individuals, psychoanalysis is the treatment of choice; i.e. for those people psychoanalysis offers significantly greater improvement than any other treatment. Unfortunately, however, the results of psychoanalytic treatment are not always so impressive. Patients sometimes quit their treatment. At other times the psychoanalyst has to interrupt the analytic treatment prematurely, because the patient's condition is significantly worsening. In other cases the analysis becomes interminable; i.e. little or no change is occurring for long periods of time. Since psychoanalysis is one of the most intensive, time-consuming, expensive treatments available to people with emotional problems, these treatment failures are particularly disappointing to both the patient and the analyst.

The Menninger group (Kernberg et al., 1972) found that the outcomes of psychoanalytic treatment varied from very great improvement to little or no improvement. As in that study where careful selection procedures were instituted to screen for suitable psychoanalytic patients, other studies have been reported where the outcomes of psychoanalysis were also quite variable. Hendrick (1967), citing statistics for the Berlin Institute during the period 1920–1930, reports the overall completion rate of 363 out of a total of 604 cases (60.

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