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Money-Kyrle, R. (1976). Introduction to the Work of Bion: By Leon Grinberg, Dario Sor, Elizabeth Tabak de Bianchedi. Translated from the Spanish by Alberto Hahn. Scotland: Clunie Press, publishers to the Roland Harris Educational Trust. 1975. Pp. 82.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 57:500-502.

(1976). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 57:500-502

Introduction to the Work of Bion: By Leon Grinberg, Dario Sor, Elizabeth Tabak de Bianchedi. Translated from the Spanish by Alberto Hahn. Scotland: Clunie Press, publishers to the Roland Harris Educational Trust. 1975. Pp. 82.

Review by:
Roger Money-Kyrle

There is a fairly wide-spread belief among analysts, which I share, that Bion's works are both very important and very difficult to understand. Moreover, the difficulty is felt to reside in the novelty of the notions introduced rather than in any obscurity of expression, which is expected to become clear as soon as the novel notions are recognized for what they are.

The book to be reviewed is a summary of Bion's works arranged in such a way that an understanding of one notion is likely to help the reader to understand the next one to be introduced. And I think this aim has been very well achieved and that, by this linking of one new concept with another and by the general discussion of them, Bion's works are made a good deal easier to understand. And if the reader, as I did, still finds some notions difficult, perhaps this is a salutary experience. For it makes one realize that however much analysis one thinks one knows, there is always an infinite amount which remains unknown to one—in other words, that psychoanalysis is an endless quest.

Whether this review of a review, or 'transformation of a transformation' to use one of Bion's terms, will make it any easier, I do not know. But as a start it occurs to me that some of his notions become easier if one remembers that much of what he is writing about is that mysterious thing called instinct, particularly the cognative aspect of it which is now, for the first time, being psychoanalytically explored. For instance, although he expressly calls them instinctive, it is easy to forget that the 'basic assumptions' which can, he believes, be observed in a group, are in his view instinctive.

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