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Khan, M.R. (1981). Countertransference. The Therapist's Contribution to the Therapeutic Situation: Edited by Lawrence Epstein & Arthur H. Feiner. Jason Aronson, 1980. Pp. 476.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 62:128.

(1981). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 62:128

Countertransference. The Therapist's Contribution to the Therapeutic Situation: Edited by Lawrence Epstein & Arthur H. Feiner. Jason Aronson, 1980. Pp. 476.

Review by:
M. Masud R. Khan

Drs Epstein and Feiner have collated in this book some of the significant papers on Countertransference published in the Journal of the William Alanson White Psychoanalytical Society: Contemporary Psychoanalysis. Besides the twelve papers already published, there are five new ones that are by invitation, evidently. The editors have written a short but sagacious introduction, especially highlighting the contributions of Paula Heimann, Margaret Little, Winnicott and Racker.

Perhaps for psychoanalysts, Michael Fordham's paper, 'Analytical Psychology and Countertransference' will be of special interest, since it spells out very lucidly the Jungian approach. Fordham specially emphasizes Jung's recognition of the 'analyst's capacity to introject his patient's psychopathology and become confused or disoriented'. The clinical material that Dr Fordham presents is very brief, but pertinent.

It is not possible to do justice to a book which is largely a collection of papers. One does notice that the editors have chosen for some reason to disregard contributions from the Independent Group of British Psychoanalysis, as well as from members of the French Psychoanalytic Society. This gives the book a certain parochial bias. All the same, the editors have managed to give a fairly panoramic view of the shifting emphasis in psychoanalytic practice on the analyst's role and contribution to the total clinical situation.

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