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Khan, M.R. (1982). Returning to Freud: Clinical Psychoanalysis in the School of Lacan: Selections Edited and Translated by Stuart Schneiderman. New Haven: Yale University Press. 1980. Pp. 265.. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 63:95-98.

(1982). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 63:95-98

Returning to Freud: Clinical Psychoanalysis in the School of Lacan: Selections Edited and Translated by Stuart Schneiderman. New Haven: Yale University Press. 1980. Pp. 265.

Review by:
M. Masud R. Khan

The first time one can locate Dr Lacan addressing psychoanalysts outside Paris is at the sixteenth International Congress of Psycho-analysis in Zurich, with his paper: 'The Mirror-Stage Source of the I-Function', a summary of which was published in the International Journal of Psycho-Analysis (30, 1949). One senses an ominous note in the opening paragraph:

The theory of the 'mirror stage' has already been presented to the International Congress of 1936 (in Marienbad) but has remained unpublished in its report (p. 203).

Quite true! In the Report of that Congress in the International Journal of Psycho-Analysis 18, 1937, one finds Dr Jacques Lacan only as listed amongst 'Associate Members' of the French Psychoanalytic Society. The definitive text was published first in R.F.P. (13, 1949), and later in Lacan's Ecrits (1966). In between these two dates, Lacan had 'left' the Paris Psychoanalytic Society, and in the fifties he was already much talked about in the French cafés, and his 'seminars' were attracting varied and vast audiences. When Écrits was published in 1966, in Paris by Editions du Seuil, Lacan became, as it were overnight, legendary. In 1968, Lacan reinforced his position by starting the Journal, Scilicet (chez Seuil). The subtitle on the dustcover speaks his message: 'tu peux savoir ce qu'en pense l'Ecole Freudienne de Paris'. In 1973 Lacan further established his status, both in legend and psychoanalytic literature, by publishing his 'Seminars'.

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