Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To open articles without exiting the current webpage…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To open articles without exiting your current search or webpage, press Ctrl + Left Mouse Button while hovering over the desired link. It will open in a new Tab in your internet browser.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Haute, P.V. (2005). Infantile sexuality, primary object-love and the anthropological significance of the Oedipus complex: Re-reading Freud's ‘Female sexuality’. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 86(6):1661-1678.

(2005). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 86(6):1661-1678

Infantile sexuality, primary object-love and the anthropological significance of the Oedipus complex: Re-reading Freud's ‘Female sexuality’

Philippe Van Haute

The author attempts to show why and in what respect Freud's famous article ‘Female sexuality’ can still be a source of inspiration for a contemporary metapsychology. In this text, Freud acknowledges the importance of the child's tie to its mother for the first time. Both Balint and Bowlby consider this text to be a distant forerunner of their own theories on primary object-love and attachment respectively. At the same time, Freud's text contains some elements of a ‘theory of generalized seduction’as it was developed in the last decades by Jean Laplanche. ‘Female sexuality’ therefore presents itself as the perfect point of departure for a discussion of the relation between primary object-love (and attachment) and sexuality. Based on his reading of Freud's text, the author argues that human subjectivity is characterized by the lack of attunement between the world of the adult and the world of the child. This insight allows for a reformulation of the anthropological significance of the Oedipus and castration complexes. They are no longer interpreted as universal problems that every child has to face, but as historical and contingent solutions to the lack of attunement between the child and the adult that is essential to human subjectivity.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.