Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To use Pocket to save bookmarks to PEP-Web articles…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Pocket (formerly “Read-it-later”) is an excellent third-party plugin to browsers for saving bookmarks to PEP-Web pages, and categorizing them with tags.

To save a bookmark to a PEP-Web Article:

  • Use the plugin to “Save to Pocket”
  • The article referential information is stored in Pocket, but not the content. Basically, it is a Bookmark only system.
  • You can add tags to categorize the bookmark to the article or book section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Cooper, A. (2011). Object Relations and Social Relations: The Implications of the Relational Turn in Psychoanalysis edited by Simon Clarke, Herbert Hahn and Paul Hoggett Karnac, London, 2008; 210 pp; $21.99. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 92(5):1336-1340.

(2011). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 92(5):1336-1340

Object Relations and Social Relations: The Implications of the Relational Turn in Psychoanalysis edited by Simon Clarke, Herbert Hahn and Paul Hoggett Karnac, London, 2008; 210 pp; $21.99

Review by:
Andrew Cooper

This book represents an important and positive challenge to mainstream clinical psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. It sits within a long tradition of work, reaching back to Freud himself, concerned with the social engagement of psychoanalysis and the contribution of psychoanalysis to social engagement. Many of the authors are experienced psychoanalytic clinicians, all of them know their theory intimately, and each has a distinctive history or sphere of engagement that informs their thinking on a spectrum encompassing clinical work, research, organizational consultancy, front line welfare and teaching. The collection's epicentre is the innovative programme of work led by Paul Hoggett at the University of the West of England, which is part of a growing network of centres for psychoanalytically informed ‘psychosocial studies’ in the UK. One point of origin for this work lies in the Psychoanalysis and the Public Sphere conferences of the 1990s, hosted at the University of East London, where psychosocial studies also still flourish. These were marvellously creative events that helped revitalize a socially radical spirit in British psychoanalysis.

What is the intellectual project at the heart of this book? In her chapter on ‘Artistic Output as Intersubjective Third’, Lynn Froggett explores some practices associated with ‘restorative justice’ and refers to one of its aims as seeking “to restore a sense of connection between victim and offender in which both parties acknowledge themselves to belong to the same moral community” (p.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.