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If you know the bibliographic details of a journal article, use the Journal Section to find it quickly. First, find and click on the Journal where the article was published in the Journal tab on the home page. Then, click on the year of publication. Finally, look for the author’s name or the title of the article in the table of contents and click on it to see the article.

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Wilson, M. (2012). A Disturbance in the Field: Essays in Transference-Counter Transference Engagement by Steven H. Cooper Routledge, New York, 2010; 256 pp; £33.26. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 93(3):808-813.

(2012). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 93(3):808-813

A Disturbance in the Field: Essays in Transference-Counter Transference Engagement by Steven H. Cooper Routledge, New York, 2010; 256 pp; £33.26

Review by:
Mitchell Wilson

Steven Cooper is among our very finest contributors to the literature on clinical psychoanalysis. This book of essays, many of which were published previously in somewhat different form, continues the high standard he has set in his earlier work.

While filled with thoughtful ideas, case descriptions and creative syntheses of disparate theoretical concepts, what is most impressive about these papers is the open and non-proprietary sensibility that marks every page and every sentence. When Cooper writes about his ideas, he is quick to include other psychoanalytic thinkers whose writings have influenced him. He does not get hung up on terms and names and in this sense is a ‘lumper’, not a ‘splitter’. While open-minded, Cooper is also rigorous. He is tough when he has to be -in how he thinks, what he writes and how he participates in his own clinical work. His ideas are drawn from a focus on unconscious conflict and fantasy (conflict theory a la Brenner and neo-Kleinian concepts), set against the background of American relational psychoanalysis (interpersonal experience and interaction).

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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